Sunday, March 6, 2016

A Review: 12 small Cityscapes

The second series of challenges for our Twelve by the Dozen group has come to an end. Every three months, we each produced an 8.5" x 11", featuring a colour chosen by one of the members. I decided right from the beginning to do all twelve as Cityscapes, giving me a cohesive series at the end of the three years.

So here, from first to last, are the twelve Cityscapes that I made for this series. To see the work of the other members, please visit the Twelve by the Dozen website.

Aubergine - View from the Academy
Green - Water Tower #3

Blue Hibiscus - Berkhamsted #3
Red - View from the High Line
Apricot - Water Tower #6
Grey - Port Clyde
Turquoise - Camden Town #3
Sand - Prague, Little Quarter
White - Greek Village
Marsala - Water Tower #9
Apple Green - St. Paul de Vence
Yellow - Haut-de-Cagnes

This series was fun for me and I'd like to think it taught me something about colour and composition.

Do you have a favourite? Let me know!


6 comments:

Vickie said...

So hard to choose! The Greek Village is one of my favorites because I love the rhythm of the rectangular shapes as well as the contrast between the light walls and dark windows. I also love Prague for the cool rooftops and detailed stitching. Great collection!

Heather Dubreuil said...

Thanks for your comment, Vickie. I found the Greek Village interesting to work on, because the photo showed that the white walls were in fact reflecting other colours, like pale turquoise or pale violet -- at least the shadows appeared to have those colours in them.

kay said...

Port Clyde has been a particular favorite since I first laid eyes on it, and the Greek Village a second favorite. Those lines!!

Heather Dubreuil said...

It's one of my favourites, too. Kay. The phone lines are visually interesting, and they also serve to attach the layers together.

mona said...

Port Clyde has my vote. Somehow there is perfect harmony with the warm and cool greys.

Heather Dubreuil said...

And the colour palette was very close to the reality of a seaside town shrouded in fog.